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Silent Majority Poster

Poster by Primo Angeli for , with Primo Angeli Design , . President Richard Nixon said it in a speech on radio during the Vietnam conflict. When I heard it, my mind's eye registered a military graveyard. Moments later, I telephoned my friend, photographer Lars Speyer in Palo Alto, and told him the story. That same morning, he shot the picture at nearby Colma Military Cemetery. The same day, he brought back a black and white photograph of the graveyard with numbers instead of names etched on the tombstones. I cropped the picture and added a black border and a white stencil military typeface, "The Silent Majority." The next day the printer ran it. The third day, by coincidence, the Western Mobilization to End the War in Vietnam came through San Francisco and picked up and distributed the poster in their historic peace march. As we watched from the steps of the San Francisco City Hall the thrill for us was, well, amazing, to say the least. Then the wire services carried it. It became a clear message beyond Nixon's intent. Yet on another level, it portrayed the reality of war and was a touchstone for all sides for or against the tragic conflict. Looking back, I suppose I should have thanked Mr. Nixon for those words. In terms of idea and production, it was the fastest concept to street poster I have ever created and probably the finest.

project type: Poster

Agency: Primo Angeli Design

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Updated 3 months ago
Project Description

President Richard Nixon said it in a speech on radio during the Vietnam conflict. When I heard it, my mind's eye registered a military graveyard. Moments later, I telephoned my friend, photographer Lars Speyer in Palo Alto, and told him the story. That same morning, he shot the picture at nearby Colma Military Cemetery. The same day, he brought back a black and white photograph of the graveyard with numbers instead of names etched on the tombstones. I cropped the picture and added a black border and a white stencil military typeface, "The Silent Majority." The next day the printer ran it. The third day, by coincidence, the Western Mobilization to End the War in Vietnam came through San Francisco and picked up and distributed the poster in their historic peace march. As we watched from the steps of the San Francisco City Hall the thrill for us was, well, amazing, to say the least. Then the wire services carried it. It became a clear message beyond Nixon's intent. Yet on another level, it portrayed the reality of war and was a touchstone for all sides for or against the tragic conflict. Looking back, I suppose I should have thanked Mr. Nixon for those words. In terms of idea and production, it was the fastest concept to street poster I have ever created and probably the finest.

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